Art, Art and education, creativity, Education

Painting time

We all experienced once,  painting with children: quickly the table, the walls, bodies and faces turn into masterpiece… If you follow my blog you should know that I would tell you that to forbid is not the correct answer. However there is limit, and it’s good that your child know when he/she reaches it. So what can we do for this (never) happen ? face-807496_1280

I summarize here the main tricks as my view, for your painting session becomes a peaceful creative moment to share with your child :

  • Protect everything, yes everything : It sounds obvious but to many times we think that these is out of reach, or this will never happen. We agree that put a plastic film on furnitures it’s easier then cleaning them. Put on apron and a helmet if needed. I think you understand, spend few more minutes to prepare is better then few hours of cleaning.

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  • Use a bigger paper sheet : sometimes children just need more space to express their art. About paper, you should make it all wet before painting, try and see the difference.
  • Use your biggest brush, or a sponge : little ones must have a big thing to paint, we forget it but fingers are the best brushes and they are free. So don’t feel bad if you only have tiny brushes for your 3 years old, you can both use your personal brushes.

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  • Co-operation : painting, and this value for each (art) activity, must be a ritual with your child(ren). I mean that they should help you to prepare and clean as much as they can. The activity must be prepared in a way that children can be a part of the whole process. They are the one who prepare, paint and clean. You will be surprised how much fun they can have to clean a board and wash brushes. Of course it will be harder if you never let your child help you for any task but it can be the first of a great lineage, let’s be optimistic! I give you one magic ingredient cause I know how hard it can be at the beginning : make it new. I mean that the activity should be in a new room or place. Bring a table outside, if the weather allows you, or meet friends to their place can be your magic ingredient. Find a way to bring change, you will be surprise of the result.

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  • Mathematician and Dreamer : there are children who feel more comfortable drawing then painting, it’s absolutely normal. In general Drawers are the ones who will prefer doing math or geometry. In general Painters are the ones who will prefer poetry or history. I could write a book about it. To sum up, they are right or left brain dominante. What we can do to help children balance this tendency is to : draw more then painting for a Dreamer, fix goals even if you don’t achieve it, make activity step by step. Paint more then draw for a Mathematician, make things big and colorful, playing must be in the center of the activity. Believe me, your child, even if he/she doesn’t know it, will reward you their whole life.family-557100_1280

Now that you know how to give the freedom your child needs to explore and express his/her creative potential… Brush, ready.. go!

I will be glad to hear how you experienced painting with your child(ren), let me know in the comment so I can help you if I can. If you have request for a next article, tell me, it’s our blog and I do my best to help you.

In the next tutorial you will know how to make homemade clay.

If you want to know more about creativity benefits I give you the link to my article about it : Creativity benefits

I you want to know more about : Educational Art

 

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Art and education, Education, Waldorf

Waldorf Education from a Neuroscientific Perspective

Since few years Neuroscience has been vulgarize, lightening many field, and especially everything that touch well being of children. But what does Neuroscience says about Waldorf Pedagogy?

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Let me introduce you Dr.Melrose: Dr. Regalena “Reggie” Melrose is a licensed clinical and credentialed school psychologist with nearly 20 years experience working with children and adolescents in schools, clinical settings, and private practice. She is the author of several books including, “You Can Heal Your Child: A Guide for Parents of Misdiagnosed, Stressed, Traumatized, and Otherwise Misunderstood Children,” and the groundbreaking, “Why Students Underachieve: What Educators and Parents Can Do about It.” Dr. Melrose is an international speaker on the effects of stress and trauma on the brain, learning, and behavior and maintains a private practice healing the effects of stress and trauma in children, adolescents, and adults, in Long Beach, CA. Her Website.

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These purpose was shared during a lecture gave by Dr.Melrose. The topic was on brain development and, specifically, how cutting-edge neuroscience supports Waldorf theories.

Why Waldorf works has more to do with how the brain develops and functions optimally than Rudolf Steiner ever could have known. Sure the educator and founder of Waldorf Education theorized convincingly about how children learn best, but until MRIs and other sophisticated measures of the brain were developed, we had no way to prove or disprove any of Steiner’s theories, not with the kind of precision and accuracy we can now. An overwhelming body of evidence from the last 20 years of neuroscientific inquiry supports Steiner’s theories, including some of the most fundamental foci of Waldorf Education.

Three foci thrill me the most, both as a parent of a Waldorf student and as an international speaker on the topic of learning, behavior, and the brain: holism, play, and nature. An emphasis on all three is consistent with how the brain learns best: when the whole brain is engaged at any given moment, when its foundational neural connections have been given ample time to develop, and when it is in an optimally aroused state.Knowing how the brain develops is essential to understanding why these three foci are so important to the success of any educational program. Let us first learn some basic fundamentals of the brain. First of all, it is “triune,” that is, it has three parts. More importantly, not all three parts are fully developed at birth as we once believed. In fact, very little of a newborn’s brain is “online” and “ready to go.” When the brains of newborn babies are observed with an MRI, the only part of the brain that is lit up or active is the most primal part – the brain stem, sensing brain, or “animal brain,” as it is also called. (Small underdeveloped parts of the auditory and visual cortices are the only exceptions.) This primal part of the brain is responsible for our experience of arousal and stress. It kicks into high gear and mediates our fight or flight response when needed. I like to call it the “sensory brain” because it only speaks the language of sensations, the only language that most consistently enables our survival. When we encounter a bear in the woods, for example, our words will not save us, but our heightened senses do.

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The second and third parts of our brain – the limbic, feeling brain and the neocortex or thinking brain, respectively – only begin to develop after birth. This is critical new knowledge that provides a compelling answer to the long, highly debated question of nature versus nurture. We now know that because we only have use of a very small part of our brain at birth, the brain is literally sculpted by the experiences we have interacting with others in the environment. It is not until 3 to 4 months of age, when the feeling brain has become activated by experience that newborns are able to express more than just states of distress or contentment, as it does with only the sensory brain. At this somewhat older age, babies can share a wide range of emotions, thereby giving us a more social baby.

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Steiner’s approach to education was a holistic one. He recognized that our senses, feelings, and cognitions must all be actively engaged at each stage of development in order for students to maintain, over the long term, a joy and love of learning. Waldorf educators do not make the same mistake made by a number of other more traditional, conventional, and mainstream models of education. Waldorf educators do not overvalue the development of the neocortex and left brain to the exclusion of the right brain, that which senses and feels deeply. It does not focus at too young of an age, before the brain is ready, on purely academic endeavors that attempt with rigor to engage a part of the brain that the child has little access to, the underdeveloped neocortex. (The neocortex is not fully developed until we are in our mid- to late twenties!) Instead, what Waldorf educators do successfully is involve and nourish the sensing, feeling parts of the brain, those easily accessed by young children, so that essential foundational neural connections needed for later academic learning are solidly laid.”

Next week I will develop one those three foci of Waldorf Education : The play.

If you are curious about Waldorf Education I recommend you to check this website.

You can also see my article about Creativity benefits.

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